Scout Troop Posts

Campfire’s Burning, Draw Near

Since 2016, 23rd Elsie Roy Scout Group has been celebrating Founders Day/BP Day with an outdoor campfire. There’s nothing too special or unique about it, until you realize that it happens in Yaletown – part of the downtown area of Vancouver. The fire may be provided by a propane fire pit, but it’s as real as the group can get to keep it safe and meet the safety standards of the City of Vancouver Fire department.

How did this start? It’s all thanks to the Cub Scout Centennial. For that entire year, the Cub Pack did unique events and adventures every month to highlight what being a Cub has become. The campfire was a group level event hosted by the Cubs and it’s become an annual tradition.

It takes a lot of working with the city to have the event permit issued – about three different departments. Since 2016, it’s become significantly easier to navigate the permit process.

We have found that having this unique event helps our group stand out.

The Power of Eleven

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month, a war that shaped and rocked our society came to an end. Every year we gather, listen to our history, reflect on those who died, and remember. As a Scouter, I’m passionate about taking time to remember – not just WW1, but all wars.

Founders Day

A short 161 years ago in Paddington, UK – Lord Baden Powell entered the world. In his fiftieth year, Boy Scouts started, a worldwide organization that has helped, inspired, challenged, and I like to believe changed the lives of hundreds of thousands. I count myself lucky to be one of the individuals who has found a place within Scouts Canada to help carry on the vision.

Lest We Forget

After attending 2 of our local Remembrance Day Ceremonies, the youth concluded that they didn’t like it. They like the concept, but not the act of doing it. Why? They couldn’t hear anything or see anything. Being in a city, our services are packed. I’ve honestly never actually heard anything being said at a service aside from the firing of the canon, jets over-head and the trumpets. I totally understood what my Cub Scouts were saying.

We asked the Howlers Council a difficult question: “Then what do we do next year?”

A moment of silence. Another moment. One of the newer Cubs started to say something but stopped, saying it was stupid. Another one of the Howlers said that they’d like to hear.

“Have our own service?”

Done deal Cub Scout.

Walking the Line

Imagine this- You’ve asked your Scouts what they want to do. You’ve planned where you’re going, who you’re going with, when it’s going to be how to get there, what you’re going to eat, and why you’re going. You’ve checked your gear, made sure your stove is clean and have your water filter ready. Parents have been briefed on the trip, you’ve got your Camping and Outdoor Activity form signed off from your Group Commissioner and left a copy of your emergency plan with another Scouter not going on the trip.

Everyone loves tick boxes!

Everyone loves tick boxes!

 

You are six hours into the adventure and something happens. A Scout sprains her ankle. Or it’s absolutely pouring and your Cubs are drenched, even though they have the right gear. Maybe you lose the trail while up on the ridge in the fog bank And the question you’re asking yourself is this—

When do we turn around?

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